Category Archives: Johnson

I’ve never seen anything like it!

The scenes in Parliament when Boris Johnson made an appearance after he’d returned from America were awful.

MPs shouting at each other. The Speaker almost unable to control them. Some jumping up and down from the benches, waving their fists and wagging their fingers at the others on the other side of the House and yelling. It was, to quote one of the more excitable of them, “disgraceful”.

I’m all for a properly representative Parliament – one that reflects the true nature of the people of Great Britain – but not for one that behaves like a group of people gathered in a pub for an argument. And all of them – well, most of them – dressed as if they were going to church. It’s as if putting on a suit will make them respectable. Jacob Rees-Mogg has a lot to answer for.

And all the while Boris (whose suits look as if they were made for someone else and whose hair looks as if it should be growing on a blonde Dennis The Menace) has a stupid expression on his face which seems to suggest that, once his ‘turn’ is over, he’ll revert to being a serious person again. If that’s possible.

I’ve no idea who should take Johnson’s place. Gone are the days when more thoughtful men like Ken Clarke could hope to take charge and be the figurehead for a well-behaved bunch of people.

As it is, all of it beggars belief.

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What does he think he’s up to?

The Supreme Court seems to matter not a jot to Boris Johnson. Even as I write, he’s probably plotting how to wriggle out of whatever they may conclude.

To me, he has conspired to prorogue Parliament just so that he can call an election, which he probably thinks he will win. On the surface of it all, he may be right. He might just win – even with an outright majority.

Personally, I can no longer decide which side I’m on: in or out. Part of me wants to remain in the European Union, because we’re stronger in it by being part of a large market, and because we may be able to influence how it [the EU] should be reformed. And reformed it should be. The other part of me wants to be out of it all together, so that they [the other Europeans] can get on with it, whatever it may be.

Either way, I am utterly fed up with people talking about Brexit when they don’t even know what kind of Britain they want – or what they’re being offered. Those who want another referendum based on questions about a future Britain – and there are many – have my sympathy. Especially when they say they will abide by the result. I don’t feel strongly about any party, let alone one that says what it would do if it were in power.

What does bother me is that Johnson and his cronies don’t seem to understand anything about what’s happening in the country, outside the Westminster village.

I live in East Devon, which is – by turns – prosperous and down-at-heel. Goodness knows where the local farming and agricultural communities think their money will come from, once they’re no longer able to enjoy EU grants. That’s to say nothing of the retail sector, which is facing its own problems.

But, of course, Boris knows best! We shall leave the EU at the end of October, come what may. Or to use his own words, “do or die”.

I’d rather die than listen to any more of his blustering rhetoric.

What the people of this country want is to get on with it, or so he says. Get on with what, I ask? We live in a broken society and nothing, but nothing, he has ‘promised’ will fix things as they currently are.

He is, it seems, beyond predicting.

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What will he do next?

Screen Shot 2019-08-30 at 13.49.02To suggest that Boris Johnson is mad is not unusual. But his behaviour lately seems to indicate that he is, at best, delusional.

The way he carries on is typical of his class: behave as if the rest of the world doesn’t exist. He seems to think that he and his ilk always know best and that the rest of us can go hang. At least Mrs May lived her life in politics by tradition and did things according to the book. Not Boris. No way.

Now he is suggesting that Parliament should be suspended, and all the while grinning as if anyone who speaks to him – journalist, politician or anyone else – is an idiot who doesn’t know bombast from bananas.

Personally, I think he’s full of the former and may just be a living example of the latter.

Gawd knows what he’ll do next.

He could countenance bombing Washington, DC, for all I know!

I can only hope he doesn’t, and that he stops short of some other madness born of his misplaced notion that he was born to rule.

Looks even worse …

With Boris Johnson at the helm of the good ship Britannia, things look even worse than they did the last time I blogged.

I saw him at a cabinet meeting on tv and he was behaving almost like a fairground barker: all finger-pointing and table-thumping.

We can’t go on being governed by a man like this, surely. He doesn’t even look like a Prime Minister. Instead, he sort of smiles all the time, as though he thinks the person – or people – he’s talking to are morons and he – Boris – will sort it all out and we have to do is be more gung-ho.

Fat chance, when so many people are feeling less than gung-ho.

 

What next, I wonder

I’ve just finished reading The World As It Is by Ben Rhodes, former speech-writer and latterly confidant to Barak Obama, and I can’t help thinking that we shall come to see something of Obama in Theresa May, now that they are both former world leaders.

Obama was dignified, principled, full of integrity and was succeeded by what some folks would recognise as (and others believe is) a charlatan.

Against my better judgement, I believe May was all those things – though she did lack some of Obama’s charm and principled behaviour and was equally stubborn, among other things – and has been followed by a charlatan.

Alexander ‘Boris’ Johnson [to give him his proper name] was never my choice of Prime Minister – not that I know who should have been – but he was the outright choice of the Conservative Party members.

What happens over the next few weeks, months and even years is anybody’s guess. We may all be glad he’s in charge and that, instead of mind-numbing inactivity, decisions are being acted on unthinkingly, if not swiftly. Or we could all be wringing our hands, wishing and hoping that he won’t, or even can’t, be around for very long.

What’s certain is that it will not be easy. Those in work will find themselves worse off; those looking for work will find it even more difficult to come by than it is now.

As someone who’s retired from work – and from looking for it – I am not hopeful; I anticipate taxes and the cost of living will rise; that I am likely to be worse off than I was before Donald Trump took charge in the US and Alexander Johnson did the same in the UK.

It doesn’t look good.

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